Британские войска на Ближнем Востоке (1916-1918) / British Troops in Middle East (1916-1918) - Antique Photos Forum - Страница 2

Перейти к содержимому


Британские войска на Ближнем Востоке (1916-1918) / British Troops in Middle East (1916-1918)


Сообщений в теме: 35

#21 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 16 Июль 2016 - 22:55

Фото № 7. "Хелуанский институт. Мой аппарат".
Photo No.7 "The Institute Helouan. My Machine".


#22 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 16 Июль 2016 - 22:56

Фрагмент фотографии № 7.


#23 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 16 Июль 2016 - 22:57

Фото № 8. "Хелуанский институт. Сестра Рэйнольдс".
Photo No.8. "The Institute Helouan. Sister Reynolds".


#24 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 16 Июль 2016 - 22:57

Фрагмент фотографии № 8.


#25 НЕ В СЕТИ   cmf

  • Эксперт
  • по униформе Великобритании

  • Сообщений: 219
  • Регистрация: 16-03-2014
  • Откуда:United Kingdom

Отправлено 23 Январь 2017 - 02:11

With the landings at Gallipoli in April 1915, the British, Indian and Dominion military hospitals already established in Egypt received an influx of casualties: in order to free hospital beds to cope with critical cases, a network of additional camps and depôts were established to receive and care for men during their convalescence. In May 1915, the large El-Hayat Hotel, a winter health resort and baths, at Helouan (12 miles south of Cairo) was taken over as a satellite convalescent depôt by No. 1 Australian General Hospital based in Heliopolis (a suburb of Cairo). This was soon designated the ‘Australian & New Zealand Convalescent Hospital’. In July 1915, the Grand Hotel in Helouan was also converted to become a convalescent depot, and the Red Cross were also granted loan of the Walda Palace in Helouan, from the Sultan of Egypt, also as a convalescent hospital. In summer 1917, the El-Hayat Hotel in Helouan was taken over as a military orthopaedic hospital, an annexe to No. 71 British General Hospital based in Cairo: here, the deformities and disablements caused by projectile wounds were treated. The orthopaedic hospital was closed soon after the armistice.

In the photographs, we see a Serjeant, Royal Army Medical Corps (R.A.M.C.), identifiable as such by the Geneva Cross ‘Trade Badge’ worn on both upper sleeves: this badge was worn by all Warrant Officers, N.C.O.s and Men of the R.A.M.C until 1923. This Serjeant is not wearing the brass ‘R.A.M.C.’ shoulder-titles which would normally also identify his corps.

For men of the Regular army, the badge itself was a red Geneva Cross on a white circular field, with yellow outer circle (gold for W.O.s and senior N.C.O.s), all on a circular black backing. In the Territorial Force, the yellow circle was white (silver for W.O.s and senior N.C.O.s). The badge was worn by N.C.O.s and Men on the upper sleeves of both arms when in Service Dress, and when worn by N.C.O.s of the R.A.M.C. formed part of their badges of rank. W.O.s wore the badge on both lower sleeves, in conjunction with their rank insignia. The badge also served the purpose of indicating that its wearer was unarmed, and protected by the Geneva Convention, although, in combat conditions, for extra visibility, a Red Cross armband was worn on the upper left arm, under the badge.

Unless especially qualified in more technical specialities, Other Ranks of the R.A.M.C. were usually appointed ‘Medical Orderlies’ if serving in a Field Ambulance, or, if serving at a hospital, ‘Nursing Orderlies’ or ‘General Duty Orderlies’ (the latter employed to chop wood, clean, etc.).

‘Sister Reynolds’ is a nursing Sister in Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve (Q.A.I.M.N.S.R.).

Following the experience the Second Boer War (1899-1902), the British War Office was concerned that in the event of another war the medical and nursing services wouldn’t be able to cope sufficiently; as a result, military nursing was reorganised, with ‘Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service’ (Q.A.I.M.S.) being formed in 1902, replacing the ‘Army Nursing Service’ (A.N.S.) as the regular British Army’s permanent corps of nurses stationed in military hospitals across the Empire. In 1908, a permanent reserve was raised for Q.A.I.M.N.S., and titled ‘Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve’ (Q.A.I.M.N.S.R.). In addition, with the creation of the Territorial Force in 1908 (primarily tasked with Home Defence), the ‘Territorial Force Nursing Service’ (T.F.N.S.) was established the same year, staffed by volunteers who continued to work in their usual civilian nursing jobs during peacetime, but who would be mobilised at short notice, in the event of war, to provide nursing staff for the twenty-three Territorial Force General Hospitals planned for the United Kingdom. To supplement the T.F.N.S., in 1911 the Civil Hospital Reserve (C.H.R.) was formed, which consisted of a register of those trained nurses at civil hospitals who were willing to undertake military nursing in the event of war, on the guarantee that their peacetime jobs were protected.

The uniforms of Q.A.I.M.N.S., Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., the T.F.N.S. and the C.H.R. were very similar, but can be distinguished by differences in shade, facings and insignia. Nurses in military service were accorded the status of Officers: entry standards to Q.A.I.M.N.S., Q.A.I.M.N.S. Reserve, the T.F.N.S were high, the women having to be over 25 years of age, (usually) unmarried, of impeccable social standing (often the daughters of military officers, clergy, professional men, merchants and farmers), and to have completed a three year course of nurse training in a hospital approved by the War Office. The nursing ranks used during the Great War were, in decreasing seniority: Matron-in-Chief, Principal Matron, Matron, Assistant-Matron, Sister, and Staff Nurse. Sister Reynolds wears the standard ward uniform common to Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., the T.F.N.S. and the C.H.R., of white muslin cap (‘veil’), grey ‘washing’ material dress (blue-grey for T.F.N.S.) with white linen collar and cuffs, and grey cape (‘tippet’) (blue-grey for T.F.N.S.) with scarlet facings (the regular Q.A.I.M.N.S. wore all-scarlet capes): her rank of Sister is indicated by two scarlet bands of braid, each one an inch (2.54 cm) wide, worn on the lower sleeve above each cuff.

Except for the C.H.R. (who wore none) each nursing service was distinguished by a distinctive service badge suspended from a ribbon, in form resembling a medal, worn on the right of the ‘tippet’:

Q.A.I.M.N.S., in reference to Queen Alexandra’s Danish origins, had a Dannebrog Cross (with a letter ‘A’ superimposed at the centre), surmounted by a ‘Tudor’ crown, and surrounded by an oval band inscribed ‘QUEEN ALEXANDRA’S IMPERIAL MILITARY NURSING SERVICE’. For Staff Nurses, the badge was in bronze, for all other ranks, silver. The ribbon was scarlet, and stripes white/blue/blue/white.

Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. had an ‘R’ surmounted by a ‘Tudor’ crown, and encircled by a band inscribed ‘QUEEN ALEXANDRA’S IMPERIAL MILITARY NURSING SERVICE RESERVE’. The badge was silver for all ranks. The ribbon was blue, and the stripes white/scarlet/scarlet/white.

The T.F.N.S. had the Royal Monogram of Queen Alexandra surrounded by an oval band inscribed ‘TERRITORIAL FORCE NURSING SERVICE’, surmounted by a ‘Tudor’ crown. The badge was silver for all ranks, and the ribbon was red with a central white stripe. In addition, members of the T.F.N.S. wore large white metal ‘T’s at the points of the ‘tippet’.

We can identify ‘Sister Reynolds’ as Ida May Reynolds (1888-1954):

20/05/1888: Ida May Reynolds born at Peddie, Cape Colony, southern Africa, daughter of Charles John Reynolds (farmer), and Agnes Julia Reynolds (née Daniell).

1909-1912: Undertakes nursing training at the Provincial Hospital, Port Elizabeth, Cape Colony/Cape Province, southern Africa/Union of South Africa.

1912-1913: Engaged in private nursing at Port Elizabeth, Cape Province, Union of South Africa.

1913-1914: Employed as Staff Nurse, The National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic, London, United Kingdom.

16/12/1914: Applies to join Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve (Q.A.I.M.N.S.R.).

19/12/1914: Accepted for service with Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. in the rank of Staff Nurse.

07/01/1915: Posted to His Majesty’s Hospital Ship (H.M.H.S.) ‘Valdivia’ at Southampton. This ship undertook casualty evacuation duties in the Dardanelles, Aegean, and eastern Mediterranean.

15/04/1916: Transferred to duty ashore and posted to No. 15 General Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt.

29/10/1917: Posted to No. 71 General Hospital, Cairo, Egypt.

15/12/1917: Appointed Acting Sister.

02/10/1918: Posted to the Military Orthopaedic Hospital, Helouan, Egypt.

20/02/1919: Posted to Citadel Military Hospital, Cairo, Egypt.

23/06/1919: Admitted to Officer’s Hospital, Cairo, with hernia.

20/07/1919: Invalided to United Kingdom for surgery.

29/07/1919: Admitted Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom. Has surgery on 02/08/1919.

12/09/1919: Granted sick-leave till 13/11/1919.

18/11/1919: Attends Southern Command Medical Board at the Queen Alexandra Military Hospital, London, and recommended category ‘C1’, fit for Home Service only.

28/11/1919: Demobilised as surplus to establishment.

31/03/1920: Miss Ida May Reynolds, Sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., is gazetted with the decoration of the Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class, in recognition of valuable services with the British Forces in Egypt (backdated to 03/06/1919). The award of Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class, entitles the recipient to the post-nominal letters ‘A.R.R.C.’ (Associate of the Royal Red Cross).

21/06/1923: Departs port of London for Cape Town, Union of South Africa.

c. 1923-25: Marries Arthur Soudon Bridgman (1885-1950). 3 children.

23/11/1954: Ida May Bridgman, A.R.R.C., dies. Buried in the cemetery of St Michaels & All Angels Church, Kirkwood District, Cape Province, Union of South Africa.

Illustrated below are (i) the ‘Geneva Cross’ trade badge worn by W.O.s, N.C.O.s and Men of the R.A.M.C. (Regular Army) until 1923; (ii) the Q.A.I.M.N.S. service badge (in silver for the ranks of Sister and above); (iii) the Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. service badge; (iv) the T.F.N.S. service badge; (v) the Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class (George V issue); (vi) the announcement in the London Gazette of 31/03/1920 of the award of the Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class, to Miss Ida May Reynolds, Sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R.; (vii) the gravestone of Ida May Bridgman (née Reynolds).

Сообщение отредактировал cmf: 23 Январь 2017 - 02:21


#26 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 23 Январь 2017 - 20:47

Incredible, Chris!!! Many thanks for the great research you've done!!! :Laie_99:

#27 НЕ В СЕТИ   cmf

  • Эксперт
  • по униформе Великобритании

  • Сообщений: 219
  • Регистрация: 16-03-2014
  • Откуда:United Kingdom

Отправлено 23 Январь 2017 - 21:27

No problem, Andrew . . . putting a name to a face is always interesting!! :JC_doubleup:

#28 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 29 Март 2017 - 00:17

Photo No.9. Someone with goggles. Unfortunately, no caption on the backside.


#29 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 29 Март 2017 - 00:19

Photo No.10. Again, reverse of the photo is blank. However, close-up seems to be interesting enough.


#30 НЕ В СЕТИ   cmf

  • Эксперт
  • по униформе Великобритании

  • Сообщений: 219
  • Регистрация: 16-03-2014
  • Откуда:United Kingdom

Отправлено 03 Декабрь 2017 - 16:51

Hi Andrew!

It's been a long time coming, but here's some commentary on the two photos . . . :smile:

Photo 9

Wearing what appears to be a fur-lined leather flying helmet, plus goggles, this man is most likely a pilot or observer with the Royal Flying Corps (R.F.C.), and probably an officer. Although motorcycle despatch riders were often issued leather helmets, for the reasons described below it is unlikely that this man is a motorcyclist.

A multitude of commercial patterns of flying helmets and goggles were available for officers of the R.F.C. to purchase privately. A number of these patterns were also officially adopted by the War Office, for issue to those Other Ranks of the R.F.C. who served as aircrew; in addition leather helmets were purchased for motorcycle despatch riders (although in practice the Service Dress cap was far more widely worn by despatch riders when on the road).

Although dressed in a very casual manner, being in ‘Shirtsleeve Order’ with no definite indication of rank, the style of shirt worn by this man makes it probable he is an officer. Whereas ‘Other Ranks’ were issued a grey (or silver-grey) collarless flannel shirt (known as a ‘grey-back’) with partial opening down the front, this aviator wears a privately purchased khaki-drill shirt with collar: this was the type worn with a tie under the open-collared ‘Jacket, Khaki Drill’, as worn by officers. The use of an officer’s shirt therefore precludes this man from being a despatch rider.

This officer wears a ‘Garstin’ style leather wristlet, also known as a ‘pouch strap’, which was a popular method of allowing a pocket watch to be worn on the wrist. British pilots flew with the pocket watch Mark IV.A (1914) and Mark V (1916), which inside the aircraft became chronometric instruments.


Photo 10

This man is immediately identifiable as belonging to one of the ‘Mounted Services’, due to his wearing of riding breeches, which were standard wear for all ‘Other Ranks’ of mounted units. These khaki breeches, made of Bedford Cord (from 1916 also manufactured from serge) were worn irrespective of climate: thus in temperate climates they were worn with the khaki serge Service Dress jacket, and in hot or tropical climates with the light cotton jacket known as the ‘Frock, Khaki Drill’.

Looking at the shade and cut of this man’s jacket, we see that he is wearing the serge Service Dress jacket (in this case, the early-war Emergency/Modified pattern, without breast-pocket pleats). Use of the serge Service Dress jacket in the desert was not unusual: although ‘Khaki Drill’ was the British Army’s standard uniform in the Balkan, Egyptian, and Asian Theatres of War during World War One, in climates where night temperatures could drop severely (as in the Middle East), or where there was significant seasonal variation in temperature (as in the Balkans), ‘Khaki Drill’ would be mixed freely with elements of serge Service Dress, to produce every possible mixture of clothing. We see this illustrated here, as this man is wearing the ‘Helmet, Universal, Khaki, Wolseley Pattern’, which was regulation headdress in hot climates. Completing the identification of this man as a mounted serviceman are the puttees wound from the knee to boot (dismounted troops wore them wound from boot to knee), and also the standard ‘Jack Spurs’, which for ‘Other Ranks’ were fastened with a leather strap.

The white, plaited cord, lanyard around this man’s left shoulder is not a dress embellishment, but a functional item, securing the 1905 pattern Clasp Knife in the left breast pocket. Before 1914, the Clasp Knife was only on general issue to mounted troops, and as a result the white lanyard became, by default, the mark of ‘Other Ranks’ of the ‘Mounted Services’ (however, the certainty of this identification became blurred during the Great War, when Clasp Knives, and lanyards, became general issue to dismounted troops as well).

On his lower left sleeve, this soldier wears the lone chevron of a single ‘Good-Conduct Badge’, indicating 2 years unblemished service. Above the chevron is the 1st Class Machine Gunner’s skill-at-arms badge (a wreathed ‘MG’); this indicates that this man belongs to either (i) the machine-gun section of a cavalry regiment of the Regular Army, (ii) the machine-gun section of a Yeomanry regiment of the Territorial Force, or (iii) the Machine Gun Squadron of a cavalry or Yeomanry Brigade.

In 1914, each regiment of regular cavalry and territorial Yeomanry possessed a machine-gun section, with two Vickers-Maxim machine-guns (the British Army’s new machine-gun, the Vickers Mark I, was only slowly being introduced into service). In order to concentrate firepower in the hands of higher formations, the decision was taken in October 1915 to establish the new ‘Machine Gun Corps’ (M.G.C.), formed into infantry, cavalry and motor branches: within a cavalry or Yeomanry brigade, regimental machine-gun sections would re-badge as M.G.C. (Cavalry), and amalgamate to form a ‘Machine Gun Squadron’ (in the cavalry and Yeomanry regiments, new machine-gun sections were formed, but in place of Vickers-Maxims or Vickers Mark Is, they received the lighter ‘Gun, Machine, Hotchkiss, .303-in, Mark I’).

This man wears the ‘Bandolier Equipment, Pattern 1903’, specifically the 90-round bandolier issued to ‘Other Ranks’ of the cavalry and Yeomanry, which had 5 cartridge pockets riveted to the front, and four pockets on the back (other mounted troops wore the 50-round bandolier, with just 5 cartridge pockets on the front). However, with the introduction of the Hotchkiss, troops of the machine-gun sections of cavalry and Yeomanry regiments were issued a special bandolier, with three large rectangular cartridge pockets on the front, and three on the back (each pockets taking a 10-round, later 9-round, feed strip). These Hotchkiss bandoliers soon became the mark of a cavalry or Yeomanry machine-gunner, and therefore it is most likely that the man shown here is serving with a Machine Gun Squadron of the M.G.C. (Cavalry).

Сообщение отредактировал cmf: 03 Декабрь 2017 - 22:05


#31 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 03 Декабрь 2017 - 18:19

Просмотр сообщенияcmf (03 Декабрь 2017 - 16:51) писал:

Hi Andrew!
It's been long time coming, but here's some commentary on the two photos . . . :smile:

Hi, Chris! Thanks a lot for such a detailed description of these photos! :Laie_99:

Просмотр сообщенияcmf (03 Декабрь 2017 - 16:51) писал:

Photo 9
(...) this aviator wears a privately purchased khaki-drill shirt with collar: this was the type worn with a tie under the open-collared ‘Jacket, Khaki Drill’, as worn by officers. The use of an officer’s shirt therefore precludes this man from being a despatch rider.

Are you sure he wears khaki-colour shirt? Its shade seems to be very light, nearly white :scratch_one-s_head:

#32 НЕ В СЕТИ   cmf

  • Эксперт
  • по униформе Великобритании

  • Сообщений: 219
  • Регистрация: 16-03-2014
  • Откуда:United Kingdom

Отправлено 03 Декабрь 2017 - 19:10

Hi Andrew,

That's true! 'Khaki Drill', being a light sand coloured, twilled cotton cloth, was prone, through constant washing and being bleached by the sun, to fading to an extremely pale, nearly white, shade. For an officer's privately purchased shirt, depending upon how light the original khaki shade had been, or the weight of the cotton, the fading process could be quite extreme!

Сообщение отредактировал cmf: 03 Декабрь 2017 - 19:12


#33 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 03 Декабрь 2017 - 20:14

Thanks for explanation, Chris!
More photos to follow soon! :wink:

#34 НЕ В СЕТИ   cmf

  • Эксперт
  • по униформе Великобритании

  • Сообщений: 219
  • Регистрация: 16-03-2014
  • Откуда:United Kingdom

Отправлено 03 Декабрь 2017 - 22:08

That sounds good!! :JC_doubleup:

#35 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 19 Январь 2018 - 00:36

After a short break I continue posting scans of photos from the century-old photo album :smile:
Photo No.11 from Ismailia, May 1916.
This one, showing not British but Indian and Australian soldiers deserves being published here anyway.


#36 НЕ В СЕТИ   Freiwillige

  • Администратор
  • Сообщений: 12 800
  • Регистрация: 14-11-2011
  • Откуда:Москва

Отправлено 19 Январь 2018 - 00:37

Scan of the backside with caption.




Количество пользователей, читающих эту тему: 1

0 пользователей, 1 гостей, 0 анононимных

Яндекс.Метрика