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Британская королевская семья / British Monarchy


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Королева Великобритании Елизавета II во время государственного визита в ФРГ, май 1965 года.

 

The Queen and Prince Philip during their state visit to Germany in May 1965 at the height of the Cold War.

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Визит королевского семейства на борт лайнера "Мавритания", г. Ливерпуль, 1912 г.

 

Слева на право: принц Альберт(будущий король Гео́рг VI), король Гео́рг V, и капитан Уильям Тернер (1856 - 1933)- капитан "Мавритании", а позднее и печально известной "Лузитании"(интересно, что он командовал "Лузитанией" дважды - до и после назначения на "Мавританию"). После гибели "Лузитании" выжил, вновь потерял корабль в 1916 и снова выжил. Был награжден орденом Британской империи. С 1919 г. в отставке.

А кто этот молодой человек в штатском, рядом с Георгом V ?

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Несколько фото этого события из Сети:

 

Фото 1: Король Георг Vс капитаном Тернером и другими лицами.

Фото 2: Король Георг, королева Мария и принц Альберт покидают "Мавританию".

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The man in the frock coat, carrying his top hat, is Sir Alfred Allen Booth, 1st Baronet (1872-1948), Chairman of the Cunard Steamship Company, Ltd., from 1910 to 1922. Cunard had commissioned the building of the RMS Mauretania in 1906.

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Лондон. Государственный визит президента Германии Теодора Хойса в Великобританию, 20-23 октября 1958 года.

 

State visit of Bundespräsident Theodor Heuss to the Great Britain. London, October 20-23, 1958.

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After a little research, what I can say is that:

 

(i) the open-topped horse-drawn carriage shown is the ‘1902 State Landau’ owned by the United Kingdom for royal use within Britain, and is one of the several landau carriages used by the royal family. It was built in 1902 for the coronation of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, and nowadays is most often seen during State visits conveying Elizabeth II and the visiting head of state to Buckingham Palace (or Windsor Castle) at the head of a procession of carriages.

It has also played a significant role in several royal weddings, including those of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981; the Duke of York and Sarah Ferguson in 1986; and the Duke of Cambridge and Catherine Middleton in 2011.

 

The ‘1902 State Landau’ is painted in a lighter shade of maroon than the other coaches and richly adorned with gold leaf and upholstered in a crimson satin. It is normally used open, and drawn by six horses.

 

(ii) the officer in what would appear to be military uniform is the ‘Master of The Horse’, who is the third ‘Great Officer’ of the Royal Household, ranking after the ‘Lord Chamberlain’ and the ‘Lord Steward’. In 1958, as seen here, the incumbent was Henry Hugh Arthur FitzRoy Somerset, 10th Duke of Beaufort. The ‘Master of The Horse’ is an ancient office, dating from the 14th Century, and was originally the commander of the Sovereign’s mounted bodyguards; over time and by extension he also became responsible for both the horses and conveyances used for royal travel.

 

Over time, positions within the Royal Household, and thus the access to the Sovereign that this gave, became issues of high politics, and by the 18th Century the ‘Lord Chamberlain’, ‘Lord Steward’ and ‘Master of The Horse’ was always members of the government in power (and before 1782 of cabinet rank), as well as peers and members of the ‘Privy Council’. However, with the decline of the political influence of the Monarchy during the 19th Century, the importance of senior, noble politicians staffing the Royal Household declined; and after a review in 1924 the three great offices of the Royal Household became permanent, non-political, appointments, but still to be held by leading members of the nobility.

 

By the 19th Century, the ‘Master of The Horse’ had jurisdiction over all matters, including revenue, connected with the horses and hounds of the Sovereign, as well as the stables and coachhouses, the stud, mews and kennels. His departmental staff included his deputy, who had the title of ‘Gentleman of The Horse’ (since the middle of the 19th Century known as the ‘Crown Equerry’) and was a senior army officer (this position was always permanent, irrespective of government); a number of ‘Equerries’, senior officers of the Royal Navy or Army, who attended to senior members of the Royal Family (in many respects similar to an Aide-de-Camp); and ‘Pages of Honour’, usually a distinction granted to teenage sons of members of the nobility and gentry, and especially of senior members of the Royal Household. In addition, he had authority over all footmen, grooms, coachmen, farriers, smiths, etc, etc, and all other trades connected with the stables.

 

During the course of the 20th Century, the office of ‘Master of the Horse’ has become mainly a ceremonial office, and is now seldom seen apart from on state occasions, and particularly when the Sovereign is mounted (although Queen Elizabeth II has not ridden a horse at a parade since 1986). The ‘Crown Equerry’ now has daily oversight of the Royal Mews, which also includes motor vehicles as well as horses and carriages. However, albeit his role is now almost purely ceremonial, the 'Master of The Horse' is still responsible for the Monarch’s safety during State processions, and could still cancel a procession if he believed it involved unwarranted danger. Today he usually rides in the same carriage with the Sovereign, or is on horseback but in immediate attendance.

 

The uniform worn by the ‘Master of The Horse’ falls into the quasi-military category, being ‘Court Uniform’, and thus prescribed by the regulations of the Royal Household and not the Ministry of Defence ('War Office' before 1964); in any case, it is of unique design. Full-Dress was and is a scarlet tunic, with collar and cuffs in dark-blue. Distinctive gold-plait lace embroidery (reminiscent of the chain pattern worn by Generals in the late 18th and early 19th Centuries) is formed into double bars across the chest; as a double-bar embellishment across the collar; and as four, double-bar, point-down chevronels on cuffs and lower sleeves. Shoulder cords are gold with the Royal Cypher ensigned by a Crown, in silver (this was and is the generic shoulder insignia for those Aides-de-Camp to the Monarch who are not Generals or Field-Marshals). The aiguillette is gold gimp and orris cord with gilt tags, attached to the right shoulder cord (as worn by all Aides-de-Camp to the Monarch). Breeches are white (as worn by Field-Marshals), worn with high black-leather jackboots. Headdress is the army-pattern cocked hat with a plume of white swan-feathers overlaying red. The sword is the 1831 Pattern for Generals and Field-Marshals, being Mameluke-hilted, and scimitar-bladed, In appearance (apart from the distinctive lace and other details) the ‘Master of The Horse’ is reminiscent of a Field-Marshal in pre-1914 Full-Dress.

 

The Most Noble Henry Hugh Arthur FitzRoy Somerset, 10th Duke of Beaufort, K.G. (Knight of the Garter), G.C.V.O. (Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order), K.St.J. (Knight of the Venerable Order of Saint John), P.C. (Privy Counsellor), was born in 1900 and died in 1984. He held the office of 'Master of The Horse' between 1936 and 1984, and as such served three British Sovereigns, viz. King Edward VIII, King George VI, and Elizabeth II. Henry Somerset was the son of Henry Somerset, 9th Duke of Beaufort. He was educated at Eton College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, from which he was commissioned into the Royal Horse Guards. Beaufort left the Army after a few years with the rank of Lieutenant. He was Honorary Colonel of the 21st (Royal Gloucestershire Hussars) Armoured Car Company, Territorial Army between 1969 and 1971, and Honorary Colonel of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry between 1971 and 1984, and the Warwickshire Yeomanry between 1971 and 1972.

 

In lieu of his Full-Dress uniform, in this photograph we see the Duke wearing a unique version of the British Army ‘No. 1 Dress’ uniform, bearing the insignia and embellishments indicating the office of ‘Master of The Horse’. Also known as ‘Blues’, ‘Dress Blues’, ‘Patrols’ or ‘Blue Patrols’, this dark-blue uniform was introduced into the British Army in 1947 for temperate ceremonial. Its purpose was to provide a smarter order of dress for ceremonial occasions than the utilitarian khaki Battledress could provide (for all except the Foot Guards and Household Cavalry, Full-Dress had been withdrawn in 1914 and never reissued). All regular officers had to purchase No. 1 Dress, and sergeants and bandsmen were issued with the uniform, but at a time of post-war austerity it was not issued or worn by the rank-and-file save for very special occasions, such as the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. ‘No. 1 Dress’ is still listed in the Army’s Dress Regulations, but has never seen as much use as envisaged, its place on ceremonial occasions most often taken by ‘No. 2 Dress’, the khaki ‘Service Dress’ worn for temperate parade purposes, and which is issued to every serving soldier.

 

On the standing collar of the tunic, in place of the insignia indicating regiment or corps, or gorget patches worn by Generals and Field-Marshals, is the distinctive double-bar of gold-plait lace embroidery unique to the Master of The Horse. Shoulder cords and aiguillette are also as for Full-Dress. He wears the coloured, peaked Forage-Cap as worn by officers of the Household Cavalry i.e. with gilt-wire embroidery edging to the peak, and scarlet cap-band and scarlet crown welt. I have yet to identify the cap-badge, but most probably is unique to the ‘Master of The Horse’! Around the Duke of Beaufort’s neck we see the Royal Victorian Chain, awarded to him in 1953. This is a personal award of the Monarch, and does not confer upon its recipient any post-nominal letters. We see the insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order (awarded 1930), both the sash (blue, with red/white/red edging), and the Breast Star. In addition, on his chest nearest his arm is the eight-pointed Star of the Order of the Garter (awarded 1937).

 

(iii) The Royal Footmen sitting at the back of the carriage are in semi-state, or ‘Scarlet’ livery, worn for carriage duty at semi-state occasions and for ‘Royal Ascot’ week. This is a scarlet tailcoat with gold shoulder cords, and dark-blue collar and cuffs, all of which are edged with gold lace. Top Hats are worn with gold edging around the brim, gold band round the body, and the black Hanoverian cockade on the crown. Stiff white shirts with upturned collars are worn with white evening ties, and in cold weather a white waistcoat is also worn. Trousers are black. White gloves are worn.

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Nice photograph of three King-Emperors in Royal Air Force (R.A.F.) uniform. Left to right: His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales (later briefly King Edward VIII) in the rank of 'Air Chief Marshal'; His Majesty King George V in the rank of 'Marshal of the R.A.F.'; His Royal Highness The Duke of York (later King George VI) in the rank of 'Air Vice-Marshal'.

 

The occasion is the first Royal Review of the RAF, which took place on 6th July, 1935, when King George V visited Mildenhall in Suffolk in the year of his Silver Jubilee. Thirty-seven squadrons and one composite unit, totalling 356 aircraft, were drawn up for his inspection.

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No problem Andrew, it was a learning curve for me as well !! His uniform is so unique that when I took my first look I thought 'what on earth ??' :lol2:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Andrew Photo 1 is of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother (1900-2002), wearing the 'Oriental Circlet' tiara (designed by Prince Albert and made ​​by R. & S. Garrard for Queen Victoria in 1853, it passed from Queen to Queen, and was frequently worn by the Queen Mother). Photo 2 is of her daughter, Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon (1930-2002). She wears the insignia of a Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order, both the sash (blue, with red / white / red edging), and the Breast Star, indicating this photo dates to after 1953, being the year she was admitted to the Order. Above the Star she wears the Royal Family Orders of King George V, King George VI, and of her sister, Queen Elizabeth II. As for the other two. . . I have a feeling they may be connected to Southern Rhodesia, with the photograph having possibly been taken during the Queen Mother's and Princess Margaret's visit to that colony in 1953, though I'll have to keep digging. . . :smile:

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