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Бригадир LJ Wyatt – командующий британскими войсками во Франции и Фландрии\ Brigadier General LJ Wyatt, commander of troops in France and Flanders.


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Уважаемые коллеги! Помогите найди информацию о биографии бригадного генерала LJ Wyatt.

В Интернете о нём практически ничего нет. Пожалуй, везде только пишут о том, что именно он отобрал в 1920 г. тело погибшего во Франции британского солдата для торжественного перезахоронения в «Могиле Неизвестного солдата» в Вестминстерском Аббатстве в Лондоне. Также известно что он на 1914 г. вроде как служил в 1st Battalion(North Staffs Regiment), был членом британского Imperial War Graves Commission(IWGC), на в 1948 г. выполнял функции Главного шерифа Вестморленда(High Sheriff of Westmorland). Вот и всё , что я смог обнаружить.

Возможно, на этом фото есть ещё интересные люди? Было бы интересно узнать, кто они.

 

Dear Colleagues! Help to find information about the biography of Brigadier General L.J. Wyatt.

On the Internet about him almost nothing. Perhaps all just write about what he selected in 1920, the body of a British soldier who was killed in France, for ceremonial reburial in the "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" in Westminster Abbey in London. It is also known that he in 1914 served in 1st Battalion (North Staffs Regiment), was a member of the British Imperial War Graves Commission (IWGC), on in 1948 served as High Sheriff of Westmorland.

That's all I could find.

Perhaps, in this photo have a more interesting people? It would be interesting to know who they are.

post-679-0-85646200-1447511422_thumb.jpg

Edited by sulejm34
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Тут, коллега, имеет место очевидная путаница. Иногда он почему-то упоминается как бригадир – «Brigadier L.J. Wyatt»( в Википедии, например), в других материалах – как бригадир-генерал(или бригадный-генерал) –«Brigadier General L.J. Wyatt, Bri-Gen L J Wyatt». И таких вариантов большинство.

И, учитывая его генеральское шитьё на петлицах и козырьке фуражки, да и соответствующую командную должность, по моему мнению верным стоит считать, что он был именно бригадным генералом.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Denis!

 

I've done some detailed research on Brigadier-Wyatt's service history for you, which should give you a sense of his military career. I've laid it out chronologically, with explanatory notes in bold type - these notes will also explain the confusion regarding the rank of Brigadier-General vs Brigadier . . . :smile:

 

14/09/1874:

Born Highbury, in the Civil Parish of Islington, in the County of Middlesex, son of James Matthew George Wyatt (a Merchant) and Eliza Pinta Wyatt.

 

18/03/1875:

Baptised in the Parish Church of St Augustine’s, Highbury, in the County of Middlesex.

 

03/04/1881:

At the 1881 Census, living in Kingston-upon-Thames, in the County of Surrey. Listed as a Scholar. James Wyatt is now listed as a Civil Engineer.

 

05/04/1891:

At the 1891 Census, listed as a pupil at Aldenham Grammar School, in the County of Hertfordshire.

 

06/01/1894:

Louis John Wyatt, Gentleman, commissioned into the 3rd and 4th Battalions (Militia), The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), in the rank of Second Lieutenant.

 

In 1881, the infantry of the British Army was radically restructured, so that (with a few exceptions) all hitherto separate and distinct Regiments of Foot (i.e. line infantry), Militia (the historic volunteer reserve, limited to service in the United Kingdom), and Volunteer Rifle Corps (the ‘new’ volunteer reserve, formed in the 1850s, also limited to service in the United Kingdom), which were within a defined Recruiting District, would form battalions of a single regiment. Within each regiment, the regular (or line) battalions, and the Militia, would be numbered consecutively, while the volunteers battalions would be numbered separately.

 

For The King’s (Liverpool Regiment), whose Recruiting District comprised a portion of the County of Lancashire, and the whole of the Isle of Man, its Militia units were designated the 3rd and 4th Battalions (Militia); before 1881, they had been titled the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the ‘Royal Lancashire Militia (The Duke of Lancaster's Own)’. The Depôt of these Militia Battalions was at Warrington.

 

15/05/1895:

Second Lieutenant L.J. Wyatt, 3rd and 4th Battalions (Militia), the King's (Liverpool Regiment), promoted to the rank of Lieutenant.

 

07/12/1895:

Lieutenant Louis John Wyatt, 4th Battalion (Militia), the King's (Liverpool Regiment), transferred from Militia Infantry to Regular Infantry, namely to the regular Battalions of The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), in the rank of Second Lieutenant.

 

03/03/1896:

Second Lieutenant Louis John Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), posted to 1st Battalion, and embarks from England to join the Battalion in Egypt.

 

Between 1895 and 1897, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), was stationed in Egypt. As such, they participated in the Sudan Campaign under Lord Kitchener, which saw the reconquest of the Sudan from the Mahdists. In March, 1896, the 1st Bn took part in the Dongola Expedition, being based initially at Wadi Halfa, then at Gemai. The Battalion fought at the Battle of Hafir on 19th September, 1896, and gained the ‘Hafir’ battle honour for the Regiment, an honour gained by no other unit present at the Battle.

 

27/11/1897:

Second Lieutenant L.J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), promoted to the rank of Lieutenant.

 

09/11/1898:

Lieutenant L.J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), embarks from Egypt for India, to join his Battalion.

 

Between 1897 and 1903, the 1st Bn served in India, stationed at Dagshai (1897), Subathu (1898), and Bombay (1901).

 

15/03/1900:

Lieutenant L.J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), arrives in England from India, for duties at the Regimental Depôt at Lichfield.

 

05/06/1900:

Lieutenant L.J. Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), posted to 2nd Battalion, and embarks from England for South Africa.

 

Between 1900 and 1902, 2nd Bn saw duty in South Africa during the Second Boer War, serving as a unit of 15th Brigade, part of 7th Division. The Battalion was present at Reit River, Jacobsdal, Paardeberg, and Driefontein; it took part in operations at Karee Siding, Spytfontein, Zand River, and Johannesberg.

 

During his service in South Africa, Captain Wyatt participated in various operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, etc., from 30th November, 1900, to 31st May, 1902. During the course of the war he was slightly wounded, and was Mentioned-in-Despatches.

 

26/04/1901:

Lieutenant Louis J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), appointed ‘Assistant Railway Staff Officer’ at Volksrust, Transvaal (Volksrust was the site of an internment camp for Boer women and children).

 

06/05/1901:

Lieutenant Louis J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), promoted to the rank of Captain.

 

04/09/1901:

Captain L.J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is Mentioned-in-Despatches, having rendered special and meritorious service in South Africa, during the Second Boer War.

 

30/09/1901:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), relinquishes appointment as ‘Assistant Railway Staff Officer’ at Volksrust, Transvaal.

 

09/10/1902:

Captain L.J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), arrives in England from South Africa.

 

03/10/1903:

Captain L.J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), embarks for India.

 

On its return from South Africa, 2nd Bn was stationed briefly at the Regimental Depôt at Lichfield, before embarking for India in 1903, where it remained until 1920. It saw action against militant tribes on the North-West Frontier in 1915, and participated in the Third Afghan War of 1919. The locations at which the battalion was stationed included Dagshai (1903), Multan (1905), Gharial (1907), Peshawar (1909), and Rawalpindi (1912).

 

24/11/1903:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), appointed ‘Station Staff Officer (S.S.O.) & Assistant Cantonment Magistrate’ of Dagshai Cantonment, Simla District, Punjab Province.

 

In India, the stations at which British units were permanently garrisoned were termed ‘cantonments’. A cantonment comprised a large area, often incorporating a number of native villages and lands, in which the judicial authority for criminal cases rested with the military authorities. Dagshai Cantonment, one of a number in the Simla District of Punjab Province (Simla being the summer capital of British India), comprised 5 villages. While a senior British Officer acted as Cantonment Magistrate for a number of separate cantonments, within each cantonment an ‘Assistant Cantonment Magistrate’ was drawn from the Officer assigned administrative duties, i.e. the ‘Station Staff Officer’. As ‘Assistant Cantonment Magistrate’, Wyatt had the authority of a civilian ‘3rd Class Magistrate’.

 

Captain Wyatt could speak French and Hindustani.

 

20/04/1904:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), relinquishes the appointment of ‘Station Staff Officer (S.S.O.) & Assistant Cantonment Magistrate’ of Dagshai Cantonment, Simla District, Punjab Province.

 

21/04/1904:

Captain L.J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), arrives in England from India.

 

04/06/1904:

Marries Marion Jessie Sloane (1880-1967) at All Saints’ Church, Daresbury, near Warrington, in the County of Cheshire.

 

21/10/1904:

Captain L.J. Wyatt embarks for India. On his arrival, assumes command of a Company of the 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment).

 

17/03/1905:

Birth of only child, Mary Patricia Sloane Wyatt (1905-1997).

 

20/11/1905:

Captain L.J. Wyatt, 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), seconded for service with 1st Volunteer Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment, and appointed Adjutant.

 

The 1st Volunteer Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment, had, before 1881, been known as the ‘1st Northamptonshire Rifle Volunteer Corps’. Its Depôt was in Northampton.

 

01/04/1908:

Captain Louis John Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), seconded to 4th Battalion (T.F.), The Northamptonshire Regiment, and appointed Adjutant (the 1st Volunteer Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment, had been retitled the 4th Battalion [T.F.] on its transferral to the newly raised Territorial Force).

 

In 1908, the auxiliary forces of the British Army were again restructured. The Militia was abolished, with its existing units reduced in number and redesignated the ‘Special Reserve’. Volunteers to the ‘Special Reserve’ were civilians who would undertake 6-months full-time military training, return to civilian life, and, if mobilized, act as a reserve for the Regular Battalions: unlike the Militiamen, Special Reservists were liable to serve Home or Abroad. The Volunteer Force was also abolished, and its units transferred to the new ‘Territorial Force’, which also now included the ‘Yeomanry’, i.e. the volunteer reserve cavalry. The volunteer reservists of the Territorial Force were, however, still only liable for Home Defence (though units could volunteer for Overseas Service). All infantry battalions, whether Regular, Special Reserve, or Territorial Force, were now numbered consecutively within their parent regiments.

 

The 4th Bn (T.F.), Northamptonshire Regiment, formed part of the East Midland Brigade of the East Anglian Division, one of the purely Territorial Force formations tasked with Home Defence.

 

19/11/1910:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), vacates his appointment as Adjutant of the 4th Battalion (Territorial Force), The Northamptonshire Regiment.

 

20/11/1910:

Supernumerary Captain Louis J. Wyatt is restored to the establishment of The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment).

 

Feb., 1911:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), posted to 1st Battalion, and assumes command of ‘A’ Company.

 

During 1903, in India, the 1st and 2nd Battalions of The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment) met for the first time since the creation of the Regiment in 1881. A large number of men were transferred from the 1st Bn to the 2nd Bn, leaving the 1st Bn as a small cadre. The 1st Bn returned to the United Kingdom in 1903, where it remained until 1912, being stationed at the Regimental Depôt in Lichfield (1903), at Aldershot in Hampshire (1906), and at Shorncliffe in Kent (1909). In 1912, the 1st Bn moved to Ireland, and was stationed at Buttevant Barracks, County Cork.

 

06/03/1912:

Captain Louis J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), promoted to the rank of Major.

 

At the declaration of war in 1914, 1st Bn was still in Ireland. On 17th August, 1914, it returned to England, and was stationed at Cambridge. On the 31st August it moved to Newmarket. On 12th September, 1914, the Battalion landed in France, at St Nazaire, as part of the 17th Infantry Brigade, 6th Division, III Corps, British Expeditionary Force.

 

10/09/1914:

Major Louis J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), disembarks in France, a few days ahead of the main body of the Battalion. Major Wyatt is second-in-command of the Battalion.

 

The 1st Bn participated in the Actions on the Aisne Heights, in September, 1914, and in the First battle of Ypres, during October-November, 1914. In December, 1914, the Battalion was entrenched in the Rue-du-Bois area (near Fleurbaix), and participated in the famous Christmas truce, which saw fraternisation with German troops. In March, 1915, the Battalion carried out a successful action in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle, capturing the village of L'Epinette.

 

04/08/1915:

Major Louis J. Wyatt, 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), promoted to the temporary rank of Lieutenant-Colonel whilst commanding a Battalion of the Territorial Force, i.e. 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion (T.F.), The York & Lancaster Regiment.

 

With the declaration of war, and the subsequent need for manpower, the rôle of the Territorial Force was reassessed. The influx of volunteers allowed battalions to be divided into two, and often three, battalion-sized units: the ‘First Line’ troops were those willing to serve overseas; the ‘Second Line’ were those who wished to remain ‘Home Service’ only (or were medically unfit for active service), and the ‘Third Line’ battalion was established for training new recruits for the other two units, and to also act as a ‘Home Defence’ unit (however, after conscription was introduced in 1916, the obligation to serve overseas became universal). The ‘First Line’ of the 4th (Hallamshire) Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment (whose Depôt was in Sheffield) was known as the 1/4th Bn; it landed at Boulogne in April, 1915, as part of the 3rd West Riding Brigade, of the West Riding Division. In May, 1915, these formation titles were changed to the 148th (1/3rd West Riding) Brigade, and the 49th (West Riding) Division. In June, 1915, the 1/4th Hallamshires were sent to the Ypres Salient. On the 1st July, 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, the Battalion was part of the follow-up assault wave. Between 1st July, 1916, and 25th September, 1916, the 1/4th lost 21 Officers and 731 Other Ranks, killed and wounded.

 

03/06/1916:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Louis John Wyatt, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), commanding 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion (T.F.), The York & Lancaster Regiment, is awarded the Distinguished Service Order (D.S.O.) for ‘Distinguished Service in the Field’.

 

15/06/1916:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), commanding 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion (T.F.), The York & Lancaster Regiment, is Mentioned-in-Despatches, for ‘gallant and distinguished conduct in the field’.

 

13/11/1916:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), commanding 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion (T.F.), The York & Lancaster Regiment, is Mentioned-in-Despatches, for ‘distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty’.

 

31/03/1917:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), relinquishes command of 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion (T.F.), The York & Lancaster Regiment.

 

01/04/1917:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), attached to The York & Lancaster Regiment, is appointed to special staff duties (graded for purpose of pay as a 'Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General'), and retains his temporary rank while so employed.

 

The ‘special staff duties’ to which Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Wyatt was appointed were actually at the ‘Senior Officers’ School’, located in Aldershot, Hampshire. The school was established in 1916, to ensure that suitable training was provided for senior Field Officers of the British Army (and Dominion and Colonial Forces) who aspired to battalion command. It was established as part of a wider attempt by the Army to create a coherent training plan for its Officers. Wyatt served at the School as an Instructor.

 

09/04/1917:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is Mentioned-in-Despatches, for ‘distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty’.

 

03/06/1917:

Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), rewarded with promotion to the rank of Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, for ‘Distinguished Service in the Field.

 

During the Great War, an Officer in the British Army might simultaneously hold three ranks – Substantive, Acting/Temporary, and Brevet – spread over a wide range. Up to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, an Officer possessed his ‘Substantive’, i.e. permanent, rank by seniority within his regiment (although Regular, Special Reserve, and Territorial Officers were on separate rolls): promotion to the next rank was determined by a combination of vacancy within the regiment, seniority, and examination. Beyond the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, an Officer was promoted to Colonel automatically after four years; thereafter, higher rank was achieved by seniority within the Army as whole, and by examination. However, because ‘Substantive’ Rank as held by Company and Field Officers was regimental, promotion moved at different speeds within regiments. Given the rapid expansion of the Army, and the often sudden need for an Officer to assume more senior command responsibilities, whether in his own regiment, or elsewhere within the Army, ‘Acting’ rank was often granted (which after 30 days became ‘Temporary’ rank): however, this rank ceased once the appointment for which it had been granted was relinquished. To prevent this fall back to often quite junior regimental rank for capable Officers who had hitherto held senior appointments, and to reward meritorious service, Officers could be granted the ‘Brevet’ rank of Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, or Major: they received the pay of the rank below (thus a Brevet Major received the pay of a Captain). However, ‘Brevet’ ranks were ‘Army’ ranks, and not regimental, and thus for an officer wishing to advance within his regiment, he was assessed in the usual way as per his ‘Substantive’ rank.

 

14/12/1917:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), relinquishes the appointment to special staff duties (graded for purpose of pay as a 'Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General'), and relinquishes the temporary rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.

 

16/01/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is promoted to the acting rank of Lieutenant-Colonel whilst commanding a Battalion, i.e. 1st Battalion, Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment).

 

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Wyatt suddenly assumed command of his parent battalion, i.e. 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), in which he still ranked as a Major, during January, 1918. This was due to the wounding of its Commanding Officer, Captain and Brevet Major (temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Vyvyan Vavasour Pope, D.S.O., M.C. Since October, 1915, the Battalion had been part of the 72nd Infantry Brigade, 24th Division. On 21st March, 1918, soon after Wyatt relinquished command, the Battalion was in front-line trenches near St Quentin when the German Army launched Operation Michael, the opening attack in their Spring Offensive. The 1st Battalion was virtually wiped out, losing 19 officers and 662 men in the attack itself, and during the withdrawal which followed.

 

30/03/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., relinquishes command of 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), and relinquishes the acting rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.

 

31/03/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is appointed Brigade Commander of the 116th Brigade, and promoted to the temporary rank of Brigadier-General whilst so employed.

 

The 116th Infantry Brigade was a component formation of the 39th Division, one of the many ‘New Army’ divisions formed from the rapid influx of volunteers to the Regular Army following Lord Kitchener’s appeal for recruits, which was made soon after the beginning of the war. The various formations and units of the Division crossed to France during February-March, 1916. During the remainder of 1916, and through 1917, the Division took part in numerous engagements on the Western Front. When the German Spring Offensive began in Picardy on 21st March, 1918 (the Battle of St Quentin), 116th Brigade held the line between Epéhy and St Emilie, and was temporarily placed under the command of 16th Division: when this Division was forced to pull-back the next day, 116th Brigade fought a heroic rearguard action in which it suffered high casualties. Over the next few days, at the Actions at the Somme Crossings, and the Battle of Rosières, 39th Division was heavily engaged, with 116th Brigade, positioned north of the Somme, becoming involved in the First Battle of Bapaume. The number of casualties suffered by the Division necessitated its reduction to a composite brigade in April, 1918, just in time for the Battles of the Lys, in Flanders. During these battles, the 39th Composite Brigade took part in operations at Wytschaete Ridge, and at the First and Second Battles of Kemmel, and also acted as a reserve during the Battle of the Scherpenberg. The 39th Composite Brigade reconstituted as a Division in May, but all units within it were reduced to only cadre strength: for the remainder of the war, the Division was tasked with the instruction and training of troops of the American Expeditionary Force. Divisional Headquarters was based at Eperlecques from 11th April, 1918 to 7th June, 1918; thereafter it went to Wolphus and then Varengeville (from 15th August, 1918) and finally to Rouen (5th March, 1919). By 10th July, 1919, the 39th Division had been disbanded.

 

During the First Battle of Kemmel, which lasted from 17th to 19th April, 1918, Brigadier-General Wyatt organised an ad hoc formation (known subsequently in the official histories as ‘Wyatt’s Force’), some 1,500 strong, composed of various details and miscellaneous units from IX Corps. At this time, although nominally Brigade Commander of 116th Brigade, the 39th Division had been reduced to taking part in the Battle as 39th Composite Brigade, and Wyatt’s services were, temporarily, surplus to requirement.

 

07/11/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), relinquishes his appointment as Brigade Commander of the 116th Infantry Brigade.

 

08/11/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is Mentioned-in-Despatches, for ‘distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty’.

 

08/11/1918:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is appointed Brigade Commander of the 98th Infantry Brigade.

 

The 98th Infantry Brigade was a component formation of the 33rd Division (New Army). The Division landed in France in November, 1915. In the last weeks of the war, during the ‘Final Advance’, the Division fought at the Battle of Selle, in Picardy, from 23rd to 25th October, 1918, and on the 26th captured the village of Englefontaine; it saw its last combat at Leval on the 6th November. By 4th December, the Division had moved to Montigny, and was there inspected by H.M. King George V; by 17th December it was at Hornoy. Demobilisation continued throughout the first months of 1919. By January, 1919, the Division was stationed on the French coast, at Quiberville. Divisional Headquarters moved to Le Havre on 28th February, and by 30th June the Division had been entirely disbanded.

 

By the end of the war, Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) Wyatt had been Mentioned-in-Despatches four times, and had been wounded in action.

 

05/12/1919:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is appointed ‘Director of Graves Registration and Enquiries’, and promoted to the temporary rank of Brigadier-General whilst so employed.

 

01/04/1920:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is appointed temporary ‘Director of Graves Registration and Enquiries’ (in the grade of Staff Officer [War Office] Class B), and retains his temporary rank while so employed.

 

08/03/1920:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is given unrestricted permission to wear the insignia of a Chevalier of the Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur, conferred by the President of the French Republic (date of award unknown).

 

01/07/1920:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is appointed ‘General Officer Commanding, British Troops in France and Flanders’ in addition to his current temporary appointment as ‘Director of Graves Registration and Enquiries’.

 

29/10/1920:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel (temporary Brigadier-General) Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), is given unrestricted permission to wear the insignia of a Grande-Oficial of the Ordem Militar de Avis, conferred by the President of the Portuguese Republic (date of award unknown).

 

07/11/1920:

On the night of 7th November, 1920, the bodies of four unidentified British soldiers were brought to the hut that served as the chapel of the town Saint-Pol-sur-Ternoise (location of British General Headquarters), near Arras in the department of Pas-de-Calais, France. Each had come from one of the four battle areas over which British troops had fought during the Great War – the Aisne, the Somme, Arras, and Ypres. At midnight, Brigadier-General Wyatt, and Lieutenant-Colonel E.A.S. Gell (also from the ‘Directorate of Graves Registration and Enquiries’), entered the chapel. Wyatt picked out at random one of the bodies, and he and Gell transferred the remains of the soldier into a pine coffin placed in front of the altar, and screwed down the lid. The Unknown Warrior had been chosen, the nameless soldier who was entombed in Westminster Abbey on 11th November, 1920.

 

01/01/1921:

Major and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's) relinquishes the appointment of ‘General Officer Commanding, British Troops in France and Flanders’, relinquishes the temporary appointment of ‘Director of Graves Registration and Enquiries’ (in the grade of Staff Officer [War Office] Class B), and relinquishes the temporary rank of Brigadier-General. Promoted to the rank of Brevet Colonel. Promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel and appointed Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment).

 

On 1st January, 1921, ‘The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)’ was retitled ‘The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's)’.

 

In 1920, the 2nd Battalion departed India for Egypt, becoming a unit of the Cairo Brigade, with a detachment at Khartoum in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. The Battalion was stationed in Ireland from 1921, before returning to England (and the Regimental Depôt in Lichfield), in 1923.

 

17/01/1922:

Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's), appointed as a Brigade Commander, and promoted to the temporary rank of Colonel-Commandant whilst so employed.

 

Before 1921, ‘Brigadier-General’ was the rank to which Officers appointed to command brigades were usually promoted. However, technically, the rank of ‘Brigadier-General’ was not a ‘Substantive’ rank at all, but merely a title of appointment that went with brigade command, or staff duties, with an Officer reverting back to his ‘Substantive’ or ‘Brevet’ rank once his command or staff duties came to an end. After the Great War, with so many retired Officers bearing the title as an honorary rank, the decision was made to alter the title of appointment held by brigade commanders: the wish was to better reflect the fact that commanders of brigades were in reality senior Colonels, and should be regarded as Field Officers, instead of General Officers. Therefore, in 1921, the title of ‘Brigadier-General’ was abolished, and replaced by two new titles: (i) ‘Colonel-Commandant’, for commanders of brigades, depôts, or training establishments, and (ii) ‘Colonel on the Staff’, for Officers who held administrative staff appointments. This change of name proved unpopular, and both were replaced with the single title of ‘Brigadier’ in 1928. It was only after World War II that ‘Brigadier’ ceased being merely a title of appointment, and became a ‘Substantive’ rank.

 

15/09/1922:

Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's), relinquishes his appointment as a Brigade Commander, and relinquishes the temporary rank of Colonel-Commandant. Resumes command of 2nd Battalion, The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's).

 

12/04/1924:

Lieutenant-Colonel and Brevet Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., from The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's), promoted to the rank of Colonel, with seniority from 1st January, 1921. Relinquishes command of 2nd Battalion, The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's), and is appointed Brigade Commander of the 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade of the Territorial Army.

 

In 1920 the Territorial Force was renamed the Territorial Army.

 

The 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade was a component formation of the 55th Division of the Territorial Army. The Division had been reformed in 1920, and was the successor to the 55th (West Lancashire) Division which had fought during the Great War, and to the original West Lancashire Division of the Territorial Force. Likewise, the 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade was successor to the 164th (1st North Lancashire) Brigade, and to the North Lancashire Brigade before that. As had been the case before and during the war, the 55th Division and its component formations were comprised purely of volunteer reservists. The Headquarters of 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade was at Lancaster, in the County of Lancashire.

 

12/04/1928:

Colonel L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., relinquishes his appointment as Brigade Commander of the 164th (North Lancashire) Infantry Brigade of the Territorial Army, due to his retirement from the Regular Army on retired pay; granted the honorary rank of Brigadier-General.

 

Officers of the Regular Army automatically retained their ‘Substantive’ rank on retirement, or upon relinquishing their commission through ill-health, or on ceasing to belong to the Regular Army Reserve of Officers. In addition, an Officer who had held higher ‘Temporary’ rank during his service was often granted that title as an ‘Honorary’ rank upon retirement, etc.

 

14/09/1929:

Colonel (Honorary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., attains the age limit of liability to recall, and therefore ceases to belong to the General List of the Regular Army Reserve of Officers.

 

30/05/1936:

Colonel (Honorary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., retired pay, is appointed Colonel of The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's).

 

Within the British Army, infantry battalions were and are normally commanded by Lieutenant-Colonels. Promotion to the ‘Substantive’ rank of Colonel meant ceasing to be a ‘Regimental Officer’, and, instead, assuming staff duties. However, in order to unite the multi-battalion regimental ‘family’, and to oversee issues of regimental tradition and propriety, each infantry regiment appointed a ceremonial ‘Colonel of the Regiment’, usually a retired senior officer (either of General or ‘Substantive’ Colonel rank), who had close and longstanding links to the Regiment.

 

14/09/1945:

Colonel (Honorary Brigadier-General) L.J. Wyatt, D.S.O., retired pay, completed his extended tenure of appointment as Colonel of The North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's).

 

12/11/1945:

Brigadier-General Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., of The Courtyard, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, nominated to be Sheriff of the County of Westmorland.

 

In England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, the ‘Sheriff’ (after 1974, ‘High Sheriff’) was traditionally the Sovereign’s judicial representative within each county, and tasked with maintaining law and order. By the 19th century, the post had become largely ceremonial, the most visible of their remaining duties being their attendance at Royal visits to their county, and proclaiming to the county the accession of a new Sovereign.

 

12/11/1946:

Brigadier-General Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., of The Courtyard, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, nominated to be Sheriff of the County of Westmorland.

 

15/11/1946:

Brigadier-General Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., of The Courtyard, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, commissioned a Deputy Lieutenant of the County of Westmorland.

 

In the United Kingdom, the ‘Lieutenant’ (after 1974, ‘Lord Lieutenant’) of a county was traditionally the Sovereign’s personal representative within that area, and held command of the county Militia. With the establishment of the Territorial Force in 1908, administration for this new organization lay with Territorial Force Associations, one for each county; the President of each Association was ‘His Majesty’s Lieutenant’ of the relevant county. To assist the '(Lord) Lieutenant' in his duties, and to represent him when absent, any number of ‘Deputy Lieutenants’ (entitled to the post-nominal letters ‘D.L.’) could be (and still are) appointed for service within each county.

 

12/11/1947:

Brigadier-General Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., D.L., of The Courtyard, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, nominated to be Sheriff of the County of Westmorland.

 

11/03/1948:

Brigadier-General Louis John Wyatt, D.S.O., D.L., of The Courtyard, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, appointed Sheriff of the County of Westmorland for the year 1948.

 

28/04/1955:

Dies in Westmorland.

Edited by cmf
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Some other photographs of Brigadier-General Wyatt, including:

 

Captain Wyatt’s marriage to Marion Jessie Sloane at All Saints’ Church, Daresbury, near Warrington, Cheshire, on 4th June, 1904. His best man, seen here, was Captain and Brevet Major Morton H. Knaggs, also of The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment), who at the time of this photograph was seconded to the Army Ordnance Department. Wyatt is wearing Number 1 Dress, also known as Review Order, and as such wears the scarlet Full Dress tunic. Officers in the United Kingdom who were on leave from units stationed abroad (as Wyatt indeed was, the 2nd Battalion being stationed in India) were permitted to wear the white, Wolseley pattern, Foreign Service Helmet, with spike fitted.

 

Major Wyatt and the other Officers of 1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment); a photograph taken at Cambridge in August, 1914. Wyatt was second-in-command of the Battalion at the outbreak of war. Those Officers who were killed or died during the course of the war are marked in red. The junior subaltern Officer of the Battalion pictured here, 2nd Lieutenant Vyvyan Vavasour Pope, located on the top row, third left, would in June, 1917, assume command of the 1st Battalion. Pope’s wounding in December, 1917, would see Wyatt become the Battalion’s acting Commanding Officer.

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Edited by cmf
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Dear Chris!

What a wonderful gift!!!! Amazing interesting biography of Wyatt!!! Frankly, I had almost lost hope to know something about this officer. I'm really grateful to You!

Special thanks for the clarification some confusing moments for me, and above all the question of who was the Louis John Wyatt - Brigadier-General and Brigadier.

You get a great research! Once again, let me thank You !!!

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