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Сержант Бригады прихожан (Church Lads' Brigade)


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Коллеги, добрый день!

Фотография принадлежит моему товарищу. Выставлена по его просьбе.

Прошу подсказать, что за персонаж на фотографии? Пиджак гражданский, всё остальное, как будто бы говорит о принадлежности к армии или какой то военизированной организации.

Уважаемые коллеги, прошу помочь!

 

Также буду очень признателен за перевод текста на обороте.

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Также буду очень признателен за перевод текста на обороте.

 

Текст гласит следующее:

"Harold written all about me.

Dear James, hope you have not forgotten who I am. If so this will perhaps remind you. I have not forgotten you and also I wish you many happy returns of the day.

With kindest regards from yours loving cousin Hank (?)".

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Текст гласит следующее:

"Harold written all about me.

Dear James, hope you have not forgotten who I am. If so this will perhaps remind you. I have not forgotten you and also I wish you many happy returns of the day.

With kindest regards from yours loving cousin Hank (?)".

Андрей, как всегда - :JC_doubleup: Спасибо большое! :Laie_99:
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Александр, возможно студент, головной убор напоминает как у фуксов.

Спасибо за версию, Вадим!

Но тогда зачем нашивки сержантские?

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Студент военной академии как вариант ( курсант).

Вадик, почему тогда не в полноценной армейской форме, как это положено курсантам?

Хотя версию со студентом тоже отклонять пока не стоит.

Подождём, что специалист скажет. :smile:

Edited by FAS
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Hi Alexander,

 

The photograph dates to the decade before 1914, and shows a Serjeant of ‘The Church Lads’ Brigade’. He is in ‘Walking Out’ Dress, with swagger-stick and white gloves.

 

‘The Church Lads’ Brigade’ (C.L.B.) was founded in London in October, 1891, by Walter Mallock Gee (1845-1916), a successful businessman and retired Captain of infantry in the ‘Volunteer Force’ (i.e. the United Kingdom’s part-time citizen force consisting of infantry, artillery and engineer units intended purely for home defence). The second half of the nineteenth century in the United Kingdom was a period during which Christian social reformers were concerned with the poor spiritual and physical development of young people. Most children left school at thirteen years of age, and went straight into the world of work. For the sons of the elite, however, who attended ‘Public Schools’ and continued their education into adulthood, spiritual and physical discipline was instilled through religious education and military training.This was the programme social reformers wished to emulate for the sons of the working- and lower middle-classes, and from the 1860s the so-called ‘Brigade Movement’ emerged, as ‘Brigades’ of teenage boys were established across the United Kingdom, to instil Christian and military values. The Churches supported the movement, as it meant teenagers continued religious education; the government encouraged it, as it meant the State had a pool of military trained young men available if needed; and it was popular amongst teenage boys as it them access to a recreational activity that gave them purpose and a chance for adventure.to instil Christian and military values. The Churches supported the movement, as it meant teenagers continued religious education; the government encouraged it,as it meant the State had a pool of military trained young men available if needed; and it was popular amongst teenage boys as it them access to a recreational activity that gave them purpose and a chance for adventure.to instil Christian and military values. The Churches supported the movement, as it meant teenagers continued religious education; the government encouraged it, as it meant the State had a pool of military trained young men available if needed; and it was popular amongst teenage boys as it them access to a recreational activity that gave them purpose and a chance for adventure.as it meant teenagers continued religious education; the government encouraged it, as it meant the State had a pool of military trained young men available if needed;and it was popular amongst teenage boys as it them access to a recreational activity that gave them purpose and a chance for adventure.as it meant teenagers continued religious education; the government encouraged it, as it meant the State had a pool of military trained young men available if needed; and it was popular amongst teenage boys as it them access to a recreational activity that gave them purpose and a chance for adventure.

 

Starting out as independent bodies, ‘Brigades’ across the country began to be absorbed by national organisations that were established. By 1883 ‘The Boys’ Brigade’ had been founded as a national organisation, and in 1885 ‘The Gordon Boys’ Brigade’ was formed, named after Major-General Charles Gordon, of Khartoum fame, who had been an evangelical Christian. Unlike ‘The Boys’ Brigade’, which was an interdenominational Christian organisation, the faith of ‘The Gordon Boys’ Brigade’ was explicitly Anglican. Walter Gee also wished to found a purely Anglican boys’ group, but was rebuffed by ‘The Boys’ Brigade’ when he offered to form an Anglican branch in 1891. Instead, he founded ‘The Church Lads’ Brigade’, to which ‘The Gordon Boys’ Brigade’ was amalgamated the same year. However, in discussions with the Anglican Diocese of London, it was agreed to form ‘The London Diocesan Church Lads’ Brigade’ (L.D.C.L.B.), to which all units in London would belong. The L.D.C.L.B. would be an autonomous body, independent of the C.L.B.

 

The C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. was open to teenage boys between the ages of 14 and 19. Weekly Bible Class and military drill was the mainstay of both organisations’ activities, with the aim of creating loyal churchmen and patriotic citizens.

 

Lads of the C.L.B. were issued with a round forage cap (of the ‘Kilmarnock Bonnet’ style worn by the Regular Army till the 1870s, and nicknamed the ‘pork pie’), leather waist-belt, and white haversack, but otherwise wore plain clothes. Officers and N.C.O.s also wore a Shoulder-Belt. The boys of the L.D.C.L.B. wore the same cap and equipment, but with a blue uniform and their own badge.

 

Throughout the 1890s and 1900s, Companies of the C.L.B. were established across the United Kingdom and the Empire. In 1896 they were personally reviewed by H.M. Queen Victoria, and in 1902 H.M. King Edward VII became their Patron. In 1908, membership of the C.L.B. stood at 70,000, in 1,300 Companies, with the L.D.C.L.B. numbering around 8,000 in 180 or so Companies. In the United Kingdom, the Companies of the C.L.B. were organised into named battalions, or numbered battalions of named regiments, the name being that of the Anglican Diocese in which located.

 

Gee had always emphasised that the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. be militaristic in nature, as emphasised by its uniform; rank structure (within the C.L.B., Gee held the rank of Colonel and ‘Chief Staff Officer’); drill (including rifle practice); and its discipline. In 1911, the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. accepted Cadet recognition by the War Office, with Companies of both organisations now able to apply for ‘Cadet’ status, and become constituent units of the ‘Territorial Cadet Force’. Some Companies did not become Cadet units, but most did. For those that did, this new status diminished somewhat their autonomy, as their military training was now administered by their local ‘County Territorial Force Associations’ (in 1908 the United Kingdom’s home defence forces had been reconstituted as units of a new body, the ‘Territorial Force’,with its units being locally administered by Territorial Force Associations in each county). Military drill, manoeuvres and inspections were now the norm within the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. In 1913, khaki Service Dress of a similar pattern to that worn by the British Army began to be adopted by Cadet Companies of the C.L.B., while the L.D.C.L.B. continued to wear their blue uniform.

 

On the outbreak of the Great War, with the realisation that the United Kingdom’s small peacetime Regular Army would not be able to conduct a long, attritional, European War, the Secretary of State for War, Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener, launched a massive recruitment campaign. These volunteers, recruited for the duration of the war only (and constituting what was soon dubbed ‘The New Army’, ‘New Armies’, or ‘Kitchener’s Army’) were to form new ‘Service’ battalions of existing regiments of the Regular Army. Almost half a million men enlisted in two months. One method of recruiting for the new ‘Service’ battalions was to allow wealthy citizens, city councils, professional bodies, etc, to take on the financial burden of recruiting a battalion, which would then be handed over to the War Office as a formed body.A feature of these locally raised units was the assurance that recruits would be able to serve alongside their friends, neighbours and colleagues, giving such units the sobriquet of ‘Pals’ Battalions’. It was in this context that Field-Marshal Lord Grenfell, Governor of the C.L.B., and Colonel Commandant of 1st Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps (K. R. Rif. C.), appealed to past and present C.L.B. lads to join a battalion especially for themselves: they would make perfect recruits, trained in shooting, marching, camping, signalling, bugle calls, and first-aid; plus, they were smart, many being already in khaki uniform, and used to obeying orders. After Grenfell’s appeal, nearly 2,000 applications were received in only a few days, and ‘16th (Service) Battalion (Church Lads’ Brigade), The King’s Royal Rifle Corps’,was officially raised on 19/09/1914, manned entirely by serving or ex-members of the C.L.B.

 

After a year’s training in the United Kingdom, the battalion landed in France as a unit of 100th Brigade, 33rd Division in November, 1915. Nicknamed ‘The Churchmen’s Battalion’, the 16th Bn took heavy casualties during the Somme Offensive of summer and autumn, 1916. After the introduction of conscription in 1916, recruits were posted to the battalion as necessary, with no requirement to have any affiliation, past or present, with the C.L.B.

 

On the departure of the 16th Battalion to France in 1915, the depot companies of the 16th (Service) Battalion were detached to form a new the new ‘19th (Reserve) Battalion, The King’s Royal Rifle Corps’. This unit, which would stay in the United Kingdom, was the training battalion to which new recruits to the 16th Battalion would be posted for basic training, before being posted overseas for active service. After the introduction of conscription in 1916, recruit training was centralised, and the 19th Bn became the 109th Training Reserve Battalion of the 26th Reserve Brigade, and affiliation with the C.L.B. or K. R. Rif. C. was lost.

 

Back in the United Kingdom, the Cadets of the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. were engaged in essential war service, guarding reservoirs and pipelines, collecting newspapers for salvage, and blowing ‘All Clear’ bugle calls after Zeppelin bombing raids. Constant appeals were made to serving Cadets to join the battalion, to replace dead or wounded men. In 1917, as recognition of the sacrifice made by the 16th (Service) Bn, K. R. Rif. C., every C.L.B. Company in the United Kingdom (with a combined membership of 80,000, more than half the total strength of the ‘Territorial Cadet Force’) came under the direct auspices of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, with the new collective title of ‘The King’s Royal Rifle Corps Cadets’. A new cap-badge was adopted for the Cadets, similar to the regimental cap-badge of the ‘The King’s Royal Rifle Corps’, and khaki Service Dress of exact army pattern was issued.

 

It is estimated that around 50,000 serving or ex-members of the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. served in the Great War, in the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force, and across all regiments and corps of the Army. More than 24 serving or ex-members of the C.L.B. were decorated with the Victoria Cross, for valour.

 

In 1919, the C.L.B. and L.D.C.L.B. amalgamated, with the L.D.C.L.B. Cadet Companies becoming simply units of the ‘London Division’ of the C.L.B. From 1924, blue uniforms were once again an alternative to khaki. In 1930, the C.L.B. Cadet Companies ceased to be ‘The King’s Royal Rifle Corps Cadets’ and the affiliation with the regiment ended. In 1936, the growing pacifist tendency within the Anglican Church was strong enough to end all Cadet affiliation and recognition within the C.L.B., with the Anglican Church now reasserting total control over the organisation. In the same year, blue uniforms completely replaced khaki. In 1978 the C.L.B. amalgamated with ‘The Church Girls’ Brigade’ (founded 1922) to become ‘The Church Lads’ & Church Girls’ Brigade’ (C.L.C.G.B.).

 

The photographs below show:

 

1. The cap-badge of ‘The Church Lads’ Brigade’, worn 1891-1917 (originally intended for the round forage cap, in 1913 a smaller version was adopted for the khaki Service Dress Cap). This badge, with slight modification, is that previously worn by ‘The Gordon Boys’ Brigade’, namely the ‘Armour of God’ (i.e. the ‘helmet of salvation’ and crossed ‘swords of the Spirit’), as referenced in the Bible, Ephesians 6 v11-17

 

"Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places. Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand. Stand therefore, having your loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness; And your feet shod with the preparation of the gospel of peace; Above all, taking the shield of faith, wherewith ye shall be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God:"

 

The motto, ‘Fight the Good Fight’ is from the Bible, Timothy 6:12

 

Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession before many witnesses”.

 

2. Shoulder-Belt badge, as worn by junior N.C.O.s of the C.L.B.

 

3. Waist-Belt Locket-Buckle, as worn by the C.L.B.

 

4. Swagger-Stick carried by the C.L.B.

 

5. The cap-badge of the ‘The King’s Royal Rifle Corps Cadets’, worn 1917-1930

 

6. A photograph, dating from 1915, of No. 1852 Company (St Mark’s), 2nd (Coventry) Cadet Battalion, Worcester Regiment, C.B.L. The Cadets wear the khaki Service Dress adopted in 1913 for Cadet Companies, which was very similar to, though not an exact copy of, the Service Dress worn by the British Army. The 'Worcester' in the regimental title refers to the Anglican Diocese in which this battalion was situated.

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Edited by cmf
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Thankyou, gentlemen!! :JC_doubleup:

 

Even in the United Kingdom, it is often forgotten how popular the 'Brigade' movements were in the early years of the 20th Century, and their importance in moulding young men to do their duty for 'God, King, and Country' . . .

 

Chris

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